Immunization Services

Our Pharmacy offers convenient, professional immunization service for adults on a walk-in or appointment basis.

Comprehensive Vaccination Service

Adults need vaccinations just as much as children do. That's why our Pharmacy offers convenient professional immunization service for adults on a walk-in or appointment basis. Talk to a healthcare professional, including your Safeway Pharmacist, about having your own Immunization Record reviewed to determine your
individual needs.

Vaccines may not be suitable for everyone and do not protect all individuals against development of disease. Some vaccines may require a prescription. Vaccines may not be available in all locations. Age restrictions may apply. Check with our pharmacist for further information.

Your Safeway Pharmacist can administer injections!* Speak to your pharmacist to learn more. 

*Where permitted by provincial legislation

Meningococcal

Meningococcal vaccination is recommended for college students, those enrolling in the military, and travelers to endemic countries.

  • The meningococcal bacteria can cause a relatively rare but potentially fatal disease called meningitis, which affects the fluid surrounding the brain and spinal cord. Infection can progress to death within 24 to 48 hours, or lead to permanent disabilities such as hearing loss, brain damage, or loss of limbs. It is spread through the exchange of respiratory and throat secretions.
  • Persons who live or work in close quarters with others, such as college students as well as those traveling to endemic regions, should consider the vaccine.

Pneumococcal

Pneumococcal vaccination is recommended for all adults age 65 or over, or any adult with health conditions such as diabetes or lung disease.

  • Pneumococcal disease can result in serious, sometimes fatal infections of the lungs (pneumonia), the blood (bacteremia) and the brain (meningitis).
  • You can protect yourself from this disease with the pneumococcal vaccine, which can be administered at any time of year and provides long-term protection against the disease.

Shingles

Rx Immunizations Shingles

It is recommended that people over the age of 50 should receive a vaccination to help prevent shingles.

Shingles:

  • Is a painful, blistering rash caused by a virus affecting the nerve roots.
  • Is the same virus that causes chickenpox. If you’ve ever had chickenpox or the chickenpox vaccine, you are at risk.
  • Can last up to a month.
  • Can result in nerve pain that can stay with you for years.

Tetanus, Diphtheria & Pertussis

Everyone should have a tetanus/diphtheria/pertussis booster shot every 10 years.

  • Tetanus is a severe infection that is not contagious but can be fatal if untreated. It is caused by bacteria which is found virtually everywhere and can enter the bloodstream through a wound.
  • Diphtheria is a contagious disease that spreads through direct contact with an infected person, usually via coughing or sneezing. Like tetanus, it can be fatal if untreated.
  • Pertussis (whooping cough) causes severe coughing spells, vomiting and disturbed sleep. It is especially important for people expecting to have close contact with an infant to receive their booster.
Unfortunately, too many adults forget their booster vaccinations and let their protection “run out.”

Hepatitis A & B

Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B vaccine is recommended for people with “high risk” lifestyles and people whose jobs or travel take them to infected areas.

  • Hepatitis A is a liver disease that can cause nausea, vomiting, and a number of more serious symptoms. It is spread by the consumption of contaminated food or water, and through occupational or personal contact with infected animals and humans. It is not a life long disease.
  • Hepatitis B is a serious viral disease that attacks the liver. The hepatitis B virus can cause short- and long-term illnesses leading to liver damage, liver cancer, and possible death. Hepatitis B is spread through contact with blood or body fluids.

Human Papillomavirus HPV

All girls and women 9 to 26 years of age should be vaccinated for HPV with a three-dose vaccine series.

  • Vaccines are available to help protect against some cervical cancers caused by the human papillomavirus. It is important that all three doses are received so full benefits are achieved.